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Showing posts from April, 2014

Manchester House pays homage to City's Radical Past

Ok, so. Just a fairly quick post. The Pulitzer Prizes were announced this week. Donna Tartt won for fiction with Goldfinch. Annie Baker won for Drama with The Flick. Vijay Seshadri won for Poetry with 3 Sections published by the uber-brilliant Graywolf Press. Talking of theatre I am hoping to have a finished play text of my own by the time the Easter break is done with. Mind you, I'm also off to the Old Vic on Friday to see Old Desert Cities, which has earned considerable acclaim in the US. I have expectations, it's fair to say. The Telegraph has published a strange list of the top 20 British and Irish novels. Most of them can't be argued with - but I have to ask, where the heck are the Brontes? To not include even one is (at the risk of sounding chattering class bourgeois) outrageous. Good to see Banville's The Sea though. And finally, a bit of telly - well, downloaded from iPad. Restaurant Wars focuses on two restaurants opening in my native Manchester. Simon R…

Process(ing)

First, the writing. It's a process, not an event.

It's typical that, on my last day before plunging myself back into the day job, I could now do with a good week working on my play. It was only yesterday and today that I garnered the momentum, first through a natural development in the story, and the second, because the script had a read through from four actors in Richmond. Having my words read out was both very helpful, and at times, particularly towards the end with one particular 'monologue', rather cringey. It's all good though and there seemed to be no doubt that the material was timely and relevant.

Another reason why I didn't get much done it during the week was because my uncle in the west of Ireland died. Suddenly I have no uncles left on either side. My Mum's four brothers all died within the last decade or so; all way short of the old three score and ten. My Dad had six brothers. Kieran was the last remaining. So it's true. Women do live lon…

I Found My Horn

Yesterday evening I went to see the second west end run at Trafalgar Studios of 'I Found my Horn', which was adapted by a book written by journalist Jasper Rees.

It's a slightly high brow feel good play about a newly divorced Dad of one and his mid life crisis who feels a sudden urge to perform the French horn solo that he so catastrophically failed when he was still at school - 31 years ago.

It was co-written for the stage, and performed by Jonathan Guy Lewis. It was directed by Harry Burton, he of Working with Pinter, and who has not long returned from Copenhagen, where he directed stage play Carnage. As a film Carnage was directed by Roman Polanski and started Jodie
Foster and Kate Winslet. Disclosure: Harry is a friend - one who is never less than creatively generous and just a really good, hard working man who is dedicated to drama.

Jonathan Guy Lewis played about seven different roles - from the Chezch voiced French horn itself, to his teenage sullen son and a good fe…